Welcome to my exhibitions. Below are three of my exhibitions. Making Waves, Borderlands & The Eyemouth Project. Scroll down to view.

Making Waves. April 2011

During my exhibition The Eyemouth Project (Below) Artist Diane Mitchell  left a note in my guest book asking me if I would be interested in the two of us having a joint exhibition.  ‘Making Waves’ is the culmination of that note.

For this exhibition I have returned to my roots in photography creating images with an old film style and atmosphere.  Although digital technology has really progressed over the years, I personally feel that the images produced are sometimes too clean.  Therefore, for this project I have scanned some of my original pieces of film and made layer masks to enhance the grain and generated noise by using very long exposures.  Some of these exposures have taken as much as 16 minutes; I believe this has helped to convey nature as timeless. Here are the images from the exhibition.

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

The Lighthouse – Berwick-upon-Tweed

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

St Abbs

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Over Eyemouth

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

From Beneith

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Mythical Dreams

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Rock Study

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Sleeping Rocks

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

It came to rest

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Emerging from the depths

Part of the Making Waves Exhibition By Kevin O'Brien

Dunstanburgh calm

If you have liked this collection of images please leave a comment below, It would be much appreciated.

WARNING!   All images & media on this website are the © copyright of Kevin R. O’Brien / O’Brien Imaging and are protected by international copyright law and by the copyright, designs & patents act 1988. None of these images may be used without the prior written permission of Kevin R. O’Brien. Including: copying, duplicating, printing, publishing, reproducing, storing, or transmitting by any means whatsoever (including all physical and electronic forms).
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WORLDWIDE.

 

Borderlands – Sept 2011

A big thank you to all those who attended this exhibition at Old Gala House  Galashiels. For those who didn’t I hope you like them.

My second exhibition was Making Waves, a selection of images depicting elements of the Berwickshire coast exhibited at The Eyemouth Museum Gallery  (Sept 2011)

For the Making Waves project I went back to my roots in photography by creating images with an old film style and atmosphere rather than show the clean sharpness of digital imaging.  This exhibition was very well received.

Hoping for the same appreciation, my aim this time was to shoot  landscape images showing elements of the land and water.  Using a similar tact, I have created a set of images that are not predictable ‘chocolate box’ landscape images. In some I wanted to show elements of the Borderlands in the dark, damp conditions that so often prevail, but simultaneously creating attractive and collectable images.

I believe there are no limits to photographic art and for this project I have used a toy camera as well as my digital cameras. I also experimented with clear acetate sheet over the lens to give a very basic vintage look. Some have been shot with high spec digital cameras but I defused the images by scanning Agfa 1600 & T-Max 3200 film and used the grain of the film base as a layer to enhance the grain in the images, then used Adobe Photoshop to construct my final images.

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Above the A1

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Windblown

River coble image

Boat study, river cobble on the River Tweed

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Breakwater Lighthouse on the mouth of the River Tweed

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

A days end

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Remnants of industry

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

RNLI Lifeboat station on the River Tweed

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Harvesting

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Solitary Hawthorn

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Remains of the day

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Trees in the snow

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Toward the copse

Part of the Borderlands Exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Grazing on a frosty December morning

If you have liked this collection of images please leave a comment below, It would be much appreciated.

WARNING!   All images & media on this website are the © copyright of Kevin R. O’Brien / O’Brien Imaging and are protected by international copyright law and by the copyright, designs & patents act 1988. None of these images may be used without the prior written permission of Kevin R. O’Brien. Including: copying, duplicating, printing, publishing, reproducing, storing, or transmitting by any means whatsoever (including all physical and electronic forms).
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WORLDWIDE.

 

The Eyemouth Project. 2009 – 2010.

A piece of history already

Eymouth harbour book cover

I have had lots inquiries asking if I could put this exhibition online to give people who didn’t make it to Eyemouth a chance to see it. The original exhibition ran from April – June 2010 in the gallery at Eyemouth Museum, It then went on display at The Fisherman’s Mission Eyemouth until 17th August when it closed. There has been a really good response from the public who visited the exhibition with very positive comments from the press.

It isn’t possible to put the whole exhibition online but you do have 90% of it.  I hope you enjoy it.

Please leave a comment after you have seen it because your comments are as important to me as those in the exhibition. Thank you.

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Trouble at dawn, untangling the nets

Introduction

I was standing at the top of Eyemouth beside the ice plant at 3.30am one summer morning leveling my camera on its tripod just before dawn broke. My plan was to take a night shot of the harbour, when I was startled by a voice behind me. Out of the darkness came one of the guys who worked on the harbour.  ‘Aye it’s a nice morning for photography isn’t it?’ he remarked. ‘Yes it is’ I replied and with that we had a few minutes of banter about the weather, state of the harbour, the lack of fish due to the big tides etc and we generally put the world to rights.  As he turned to leave I said to him ‘it’s bloody cold though, I’m freezing through to my bones’, he turned, looked at me, and roared with laughter ‘that’s because you’re a soft southern Englishman, no blood’ and with that he walked away laughing. It’s because of moments like this that I love Eyemouth and its people.

It wasn’t always like that though. When I first began The Eyemouth Project project I was looked on with some suspicion, and who could blame them when this strange Englishman would just appear at all times of the day and night taking pictures of them working on their boats. Some were not afraid to ask straight out what the hell I was up to but when they realised I had actually moved into their community and was genuine in what I was doing they slowly opened up to me.  You learn very quickly to give as good as you get in Eyemouth. It’s a hard but very open community and like many other working communities you have to earn its respect.

In this project I have tried to be as honest as I possibly can be. Some things will make you laugh, some will probably make you angry, but the comments you read have all come from someone living and/or working within the community and we must respect people’s opinions right or wrong.  I have tried as much as possible to balance this and to always, hopefully, show both sides of the story.

This exhibition and the comments displayed are only a part of the year long documentary.

I hope you enjoy the Exhibition.

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Eyemouth Harbour

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

A winters morning Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Anton Patterson filleting at DR Collins Yard

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Packing live langoustine prawns at DR Collins Yard

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Sorting Prawns at DR Collins Yard

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Processing crab at Burgons Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Loading the machines that process crab meat from the legs. Burgons Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Crab meat from the legs Burgons Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Processing crab meat. Burgons Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Camoran Crombie hanging fish for smoking. J Waddell & Son Eyemouth

The following comments are from a questionnaire I asked various  people to participate in who lived & worked both on the harbour and within the town of Eyemouth. All names have been removed for obvious reasons.

Do you think future generations will be fishing from Eyemouth?

Not as long as the government keep kicking the guts out of the fishing industry by giving everything away and not investing in our own industry it won’t.  Fisherman

I’m not sure if my son would want to become a fisherman, I’m not sure I would want him to either, things have changed so much these last few years with more and more legislation involved, besides its easier to earn your money from a computer. It’s a shame but that is reality.  Skipper

I think the only people fishing from Eyemouth in the future will be anglers that are out on day trips. Local resident

Yes!! But very few boats will be using Eyemouth as their base port.  Local shop owner

Not if they (The Harbour Trust) don’t give us a chance to work from the harbour. The harbour needs to cater more for fisherman. I’m not against pleasure craft but fisherman should come first. Local fisherman

Just look to the other side of the harbour, there’s your answer, all those pontoons along the harbour, in a few years time they will be down both sides, we will be f****d and everyone will be paying three times the price for “imported” fish. That’s the future for Eyemouth.  Local fisherman

I think the future of Eyemouth is tourism. I hope both fishing and tourism can work together but you can see already that the fishing community are being pushed out. The way things are going the large fishing boats will just up and go somewhere else, probably Fraserburgh and sadly that could be a huge problem because tourists come to Eyemouth to see the fishing industry.  I personally think Eyemouth is in danger of becoming just another ex-fishing harbour.  Local resident

Not if the government has its way. They have no interest in Scottish fishing. I think they are selling us down the road to the Spanish, rumour has it that an “under the table” deal has been done over Gibraltar and in the near future they will open the North Sea fisheries up to the Spanish as payment.  Fisherman

If we had decent quotas to fish things would be different Europe keeps cutting and cutting, there are fishermen going under every week. The future doesn’t look good at all.  Fisherman

We all know that there is now plenty of cod but the government won’t let us land it, instead it gets caught up in the nets and we have to throw it back “dead” what is the point in that? Europe is systematically destroying the fishing industry in this country. We should get out of the EU and maintain control of our waters before it’s too late. Skipper

No chance, look along the Scottish coast all the harbours are dead, it’s just a matter of time before Eyemouth goes the same way. Fisherman

They are not letting us fish, no fisherman wants to see fish stocks annihilated that would be the end of all of us, everything the government has asked us to do we have done but they just keep on cutting us back with more and more restrictions. Fisherman

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

First catch of the day – on board the Sanlormarho

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Sorting the catch on board the Sanlormarho

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Freshly landed in Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Lobster fishing off Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Landing crab – Eyemouth Harbour

If there was one single change you would like to see in Eyemouth harbour what would it be?

Well for a start they could get rid of that bloody Chinese Junk from the harbour it just looks like an eyesore.  The best thing they could do with that is to take it to the top of that hill over there and burn it.  Local resident

Encouragement of visitors to Eyemouth i.e. promoting Eyemouth as a holiday destination and cleaning up the beach on a regular basis so we can get our green flag status. The harbour needs tidying up too i.e. the painting of railings and wooden bollards around the harbour. Also having old derelict buildings which are a major eyesore   “The Whale” either re-vamped or demolished. Local shop owner

To restore the commercial activity to the harbour side & the harbour, the harbour is in turmoil both commercially and in its strategic thinking & planning. I think we have to have a bigger presence on the harbour trust and the way it is run. Just now is to punitively charge the main contributors to the harbour, they already pay most of the costs with little or no say. The tourist related side has disproportionate power in the decision making process. Local businessman

Revamp The Whale. It’s disgusting what the owners of The Whale are doing just letting it rot, it’s a real eyesore. If they are doing it just because it’s a listed building and they can’t get planning permission to re-develop it into flats then they should tidy it up or sell it. The government should be able to take it off them; they are starting to do it in England why not here.  Local resident

I think people in Eyemouth need to be friendlier towards tourists and welcome them to our town. Everyone will benefit and we may even get some better shops. Local resident

I think they should do something with the beach, when I was younger it was a lovely little beach, access should be made so a tractor can get down to skim the stones off the beach from time to time. If we want tourists to come here then something has to be done to clean Eyemouth up and make it welcoming.  Local resident

Clean up the boatyard end of the harbour. It looks terrible as you drive into the harbour with rusty old boats and junk piled high, not very good for people visiting.  Local resident

I would love to see a stop to all the lorries blocking the harbour all the time. Why can’t DR Collin go on the other side of the harbour by the ice plant?  Surely it would be far better if they had everything in one place. Isn’t that what the new road was built for anyway? Local resident

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Working on the nets _ The harbourside Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

During my project I found that the one single point most people agreed on was the re-introduction of a fish market. Below are some of their comments.

The one thing I would like to see is the fish market being used to auction the fish again. Since the closure of the market outside Burgons and relocation to the new harbour “which is no longer used”, the tourists have nothing to see on the quay side. Many tourists come to see the live auction and to see the fish being landed.  Local tradesman

It’s getting harder to source fish in Eyemouth and we have to travel to buy, which is stupid seeing as we were the third largest fishing harbour in Scotland. Bring back the fish market.  Local tradesman

One problem with Eyemouth harbour is there are not enough buyers for fish, there is really only one for fish and one for crab and they dictate the price. It isn’t a healthy way to trade therefore the smaller fisherman will never really move forward here. I think if we had a new fish market and more buyers we would all benefit.  Local fisherman

The only way to get Eyemouth harbour to flourish again is to bring back the fish market and to get all the skippers to work together and look after each other, but that’s like asking Father Christmas to deliver in July.  Skipper

When will Eyemouth realise that we need tourism as much as fishing. Tourists come to see a working harbour and to buy fresh fish. I lose count at the amount of people who ask me during the year if we still have a fish market. The one single change I would like to see is the return of the fish market, and so would thousands of tourists. Local trader

This is a lovely harbour I have been coming here for years, but since the fish market has closed it just isn’t the same. I know times have to change but Eyemouth seems soulless now there is no market, surely if there were a fish market here it would improve the harbour and more fishing boats would land their fish boosting the local economy.  Tourist

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Creels on the harbourside

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Jim Lough Senior, his Sons Martin & Jim and Son in law Tony Gleadow

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Jim Easingwood, Dive boat & cafe owner

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Eyemouth RNLI Lifeboat crew

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Young boys learning to splice a rope 1947. The picture below is the same boys today.

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

63 years on.

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Pleasure craft in the harbour – Possibly a new beginning for Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Every summer the harbour holds a week long Herring Queen Festival.This is the lifeboat bringing in the girls to start the festival

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Early morning on New Years Day, a freezing cold dip for the Herring queen and her court. otherwise known as the New Years Duke

The Working Harbour

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

The Aquarius up on the slipway of Coastal Marine (Boatbuilders) having a facelift

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Coastal Marine’s Staff pulling The Heroine along the cut from the yard

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

A Coastal Marine signwriter working from a pontoon in the harbour

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Working from a pontoon in the harbour

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

A crane lifting a new wheelhouse onto The Herione (Coastal Marine)

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

The new wheelhouse being positioned on The Heroine (Coastal Marine)

Local Mutterings

Look at all the pontoons all along the harbour.  All the Harbour Trust worry about is tourism we’re being pushed out of Eyemouth it’s getting really bad.  Skipper.

You can’t get into the harbour for bloody pontoons and yuppie sailors, don’t they realise we have to make a living here, it really p####s me off sometimes.  Local fisherman

I always get it in the neck when I go for a drink, for employing Philipinos but if it wasn’t for foreigners working here we wouldn’t be able to operate, most of the local lads don’t want to work they would rather draw the dole and sit in the pubs and get mortal or worse still get stoned out of their minds on drugs. Why would I want that on my boat? We have created a lazy and idle society.  Skipper.

Kevin, don’t get me started about this harbour, I have so much anger in me about the way it’s going you really don’t want to hear it.  Local Skipper.

One myth I want to get straight is about the wages we pay the Philipinos. They get a fair wage, they get their food and they get their fares home some people think they live on £35.00 a week that is shyte. Fisherman

Just look at all the diving boats in the harbour, that’s all free money from the EEC that is. Why don’t they give it to the fisherman to create an industry for the future?  No wonder everyone is angry in this country. Local fisherman

There are people working from this harbour who hate divers coming here but the truth is it brings a lot of trade into Eyemouth, they come here to dive, then they will go into the town and shop and maybe have a meal in one of the pubs or the local chippy, this has to be good for Eyemouth and it’s nice to see the harbour busy.  Local resident

Someone had a right go the other day saying I am disturbing the seabed when I dive and that I disturb breeding fish and upset their habitat. This was from someone who had been working on a scallop boat, these boats drag huge chain nets along the seabed dragging up absolutely everything in their wake and destroying mile after mile in the process. I have seen for myself the damage they cause.  Diver.

There is nothing better than to get up early in the morning and go out in my boat and catch crab and lobster, yea it’s cold and wet sometimes but look at it this morning what a beautiful day to go fishing.  Local fisherman

They have to stop those divers from parking their cars, vans and trailers along the middle peer. You can’t walk past them sometimes let alone get a car past. One day the Lifeboat is going to be delayed because of it and someone will lose their life. Then maybe they will do something about it. Local resident

The harbour trust would rather fine a local business for parking on the harbour than charge a levy of two or three pounds for each diver, angler etc that sails from the harbour. How many thousands of pounds would the Harbour Trust make if they charged a small fee.  Local employee

The diving boats pay under £1000 per year to moor here and make thousands of pounds from the divers and anglers,  fishing boats pay far more each year to moor and land fish, there should be a levy per diver/angler charged by the harbour trust.  Local employee

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Local lads pretending to commit suicide after their team lost an Old Firm game

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

RG Forman & Son – Local butcher

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Preparing for the day

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Behind the scenes at the Lough Home Bakery Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Waves along The Bantry – Eyemouth

Part of the Eyemouth Project. An exhibition by Kevin O'Brien

Coastal Marine yard – Winter snow

If you have liked this collection of images please leave a comment below, It would be much appreciated.

WARNING!   All images & media on this website are the © copyright of Kevin R. O’Brien / O’Brien Imaging and are protected by international copyright law and by the copyright, designs & patents act 1988. None of these images may be used without the prior written permission of Kevin R. O’Brien. Including: copying, duplicating, printing, publishing, reproducing, storing, or transmitting by any means whatsoever (including all physical and electronic forms).
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED WORLDWIDE.

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